Tag Archives: history

On patrol with stewards of Acadia National Park’s stone cairns and summits

One in a series on Acadia’s Bates cairns Within minutes of stepping onto the popular Cadillac South Ridge Trail, Tim Henderson spots a couple of Acadia stone cairns vandalized by passersby. “These two cairns are usually broken, destroyed, knocked over or piled up with stones, because it is easy access,” said Henderson, one of an army of […]

If not for Earth Day, imagine a silent spring in Acadia National Park

As millions around the world mark Earth Day, imagine what Acadia National Park would be like without the banning of DDT, the Clean Air and Endangered Species Acts, or any of the other changes since that first massive showing of environmental activism in 1970: No peregrine falcons nesting on the Precipice of Champlain Hazy views […]

Signs of spring in Acadia: Return of peregrine falcons, mud season, and soon, rhodora

The Precipice Trail is closed for peregrine falcon nesting, and the carriage roads, off limits for mud season. And as sure as spring follows winter, colorful rhodora and other plants of Acadia will soon be in bloom. For Jill Weber, a consulting botanist for Acadia National Park, the flowers of spring bring a feast for […]

For Women’s History Month, stories of women of Acadia National Park

If you know a little of the history of Acadia National Park, you know who the “father of Acadia” is. But less well-known are the women who were also critical in the early days, by donating land and money or otherwise helping to shape the park. In celebration of Women’s History Month, observed in March, here are some of the stories of the women of Acadia, who perhaps could be called the “mothers of Acadia.”

Revealing the hidden figures of black history in Acadia National Park

More than 200 years ago, a free African American named Thomas Frazer settled at what is now a picnic area in the Schoodic section of Acadia National Park. He fished, farmed and operated a salt works, and was the first non-Native American resident of the area. It’s a little-known aspect of black history in Acadia […]

Message to the future in Acadia time capsule, for the year 2116

If you celebrated the Acadia Centennial, you won’t be there for the opening of the Acadia time capsule in the year 2116. But you can hand down the generations the story of how you marked the 100th, and how there may be evidence of it in a special steel box in the Bar Harbor Bank and Trust lobby. Livestream of time capsule installation Feb. 3 at 1:30 pm.

On eve of MLK Day, Obama calls for diversity in Acadia, other parks

On the eve of Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, in one of his last official acts, President Barack Obama directed the Department of the Interior and other top agencies to hire a more diverse workforce, and attract broader segments of the US population to federal public lands. Obama issued the edict in the form of […]

School spirit and the Orange and Black Path in Acadia National Park

One in a series of historic hiking trail highlights in honor of the Acadia Centennial When Princeton professor Rudolph E. Brunnow designed this intricate path up the east face of Champlain in the early 1900s, he was apparently as passionate about the trail as his university, since he named it after his school’s colors. In honor […]

Trails of history, adventures in Acadia, run through Orono

ORONO. – Carrying a map of Maine’s Ice Age Trail that he helped create, Harold W. Borns, Jr., shared some incredible stories about Acadia National Park geology during a recent Centennial event at the Dirigo Pines Retirement Community. His friend Joan Netland brought some amazing memories from decades ago, of adventures in Acadia when she was a young […]